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dc.contributor.advisor
dc.contributor.advisor
dc.creatorYesufu, Shaka.
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-11T09:00:10Z
dc.date.available2014-02-11T09:00:10Z
dc.date.created2013
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.issn1461-3557
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10413/10393
dc.description.abstractBlack Londoners have complained over the years of being overpoliced and harassed by police officers. The history of such contentious encounters between members of the Black community and the police service dates back to the 1970s, an era that was characterised by the implementation of the ‘Suspicion Laws’, popularly referred to as the ‘Sus Laws’, which emanated from the legislation of the Vagrancy Act of 1824. It was an era most Black people would prefer not to talk about because of the oppressive encounters they experienced with the police. This paper has three purposes: first, to highlight the history of police abuses of power in relation to dealing with Black Londoners in a discriminatory way; second, to explore the issue of societal racism, facilitated by the trio of concepts of prejudice, stereotyping and racial discrimination; third, to encourage the debate on police accountability by discouraging the discriminatory policing that permeates UK society.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherVathek Publishing.en
dc.subjectDiscrimination.en
dc.subject.otherRacism.en
dc.titleDiscriminatory use of police stop-and search powers in London, UK.en
dc.typePeer reviewed journal articleen


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