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dc.creatorCope, Anthony Trevor.eng
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-03T09:01:16Z
dc.date.available2011-08-03T09:01:16Z
dc.date.created1966
dc.date.issued1966
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10413/3320
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)-University of Natal, Durban, 1966.en
dc.description.abstractZulu belongs to the Nguni group of the Southern Bantu languages, which are spoken throughout Southern Africa. Other groups are the Suthu and the Shona, which are spoken in the interior, whereas the Nguni languages are spoken towards the south-east coast, Xhosa in the eastern part of the Cape Province, Zulu in Natal and Zululand, and Swazi in Swaziland. Swazi represents a distinct variety of Nguni speech known as "tekela", characterized by t in place of Zulu and Xhosa z, ts or tf and dz or dv in place of Zulu and Xhosa t and d, and by other phonetical characteristics, but Zulu and Xhosa are so similar that they are linguistically dialects of the same language. However, they have important separate literatures and are generally regarded as separate languages. For these reasons and for the more real reason that it is in tonal structure that they differ most greatly, this study excludes Xhosa and concentrates on Zulu only.en
dc.subjectTheses--IsiZulu.en
dc.subjectZulu language--Grammar.en
dc.subjectZulu language--Phonology.en
dc.titleZulu phonology, tonology and tonal grammar.en
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.supervisorKrige, Eileen Jensen.


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